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Egypt opens a 4000-year old tomb to the public

Egypt on Saturday allowed the public to visit a 4000-year old tomb in the Saqqara necropolis near Giza for the first time in a bid to promote tourism.

 

The tomb, discovered in 1940 by Egyptologist Zaki Saad, belongs to an ancient Egypt high-ranking official named Mehu who was related to the first king of the 6th dynasty.

“It is a beautiful tomb, and it was discovered in 1940. We are making sure to constantly present cultural content for tourists. This is why we open tombs for visitors and in the past two or three years, we opened a large number of museums such as Sohag’s museum after 30 years of works. Today we opened this previously discovered tomb to invite ambassadors and show the media that Egypt is safe,” said Egyptian Minister of Antiquities, Khaled El Anany.

"It is a beautiful tomb, and it was discovered in 1940. We are making sure to constantly present cultural content for tourists.

The tomb included two chambers both with wall inscriptions of the owner of the tomb hunting as well as drawings showing aspects of Ancient Egyptian lives such as hunting and acrobatic dancing.

Mehu lived during the reign of King Pepi and held 48 titles, found inscribed on the walls of his chamber.

“To say that there is a tomb dated back 4200 years ago is opening for the first time for the public. The tomb belongs to a very important person, his name is Mehu. He was a vizier, the chief of judges and the director of the palace at the time of the King Titi, the first king of the 6th dynasty,” said Egytpian Archaeologist and Egyptology, Zahi Hawass.

“It is a 4500-year old tomb from the 6th dynasty. It is during the King Pepi rule. It is a family tomb of a father, son and grandson. We are seeing Mehu, his son Meren Ra and his grandson Heteb Kha. The tombs owner had 48 titles,” said head of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, Mostafa Al-Waziri.

Egypt is hoping these discoveries will brighten its image abroad and revive interest among travelers who once flocked to its iconic pharaonic temples and pyramids but who have shunned the country since its 2011 political uprising.

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